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Mimir

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OK, before anyone starts the"We can't do this" argument let's put on our thinking caps and try to come up with a possible solution within the legal bounds of EA's copyright.  

 

Vendetta Online has put a call for cash on Kickstarter.  Link:http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/guild/vendetta-online   Granted they own the whole deal so no legal hassles there, but  with all the players we have here currently we should be able to put on our collective thinking caps and get a solution. 

 

Do we have any lawyers playing? Do any of us know a corporate lawyer? What do you think...  Find us a back door.

 

Can we have an open dialog forum with ideas posted from the rank and file to be checked for feasibility? 

 

 

If we then find that elusive idea for funding this project (including getting our Devs some much needed compensation), have the Net-7 Team start a Kickstarter project.  And we all fund the crap out of it.

 

 

 

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Ya know, I don't want to sound like I am Cheapening the Devs work,  I really appreciate it! I think it would be cool if someone could get EA to just outright sell or lease the old server code and raise the money thru somthing like this or crowdfunding. I am sure the devs would have plenty to do on content updates, but.. then again, if it did happen which i doubt EA would give anyone the time of day on this matter, it would be old live status until the devs were able to re-code in the new live features we all enjoy so much now. Hell I would even be afraid to ask EA and draw attention to Net7, thus far EA either dont care, or its below the radar. I just think even a 13 year old game... the concept should never be forgotten. I am sure EA would give a denial letter in standard form of... we may create and use some of this concept for a later release.... Yeah Like Madden's Progen football 2014 or something like that LOL

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I met guy in Vegas during an Eve player convention must of been 2004 or 2005. He said he offered to buy the rights to ENB but they turned it down. It was either 10k or a 100k...don't remember exactly. So unless ea has changed we would need a lot of cash. Put me down for $200.00. Lol

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I met guy in Vegas during an Eve player convention must of been 2004 or 2005. He said he offered to buy the rights to ENB but they turned it down. It was either 10k or a 100k...don't remember exactly. So unless ea has changed we would need a lot of cash. Put me down for $200.00. Lol

I had heard that also in the past, but I am sure these days that EA really don't care that much either way. (only in the protection of copyrights) We just need to figure out how big of a carrot it will take to get them to bite. But we dont want them to bite N7. EA is so big 100k would pay for one of the exec's expense accounts for a year i bet. but back in 04-05 the closing was still fresh and they prob did not want someone to run away with a pile of cash for so little return. i.e. Fox vs Lucasfilms and star wars movies. in other words, they could sell or sit on a Disc. its all the same to them. but if it was me, I would like to make money anyway I could. renting code, or selling it if it was not really needed or wanted. It would be nice if someone there now had a sympahetic ear :)  The only thing is software can be a delicate thing, technologys used within, that still may be used in some for today, (although i seriously doubt it) I remember windows xp had copyrights going back to the 1980's to current.

 

on a side note, was playing C&C 3 the other day and i heard a sound from EnB some beam weapon sound. so some of it has been shared.

 

Then again I could be totally wrong, they could have destroied the orignal server code for all we know.  A shame we can't get  an ex dev from enb to help us out... that would prolly never happen due to NDA's and such.

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OK Good start Idea number one:

 

Contact EA see what the IP rights would cost, start a Kickstarter project to fund. 

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Nice ideal.  But with the current case before the US Supreme Court might be better to wait for a decison.  If they go with the defendant  old forgotten items like the abandoned and probably destroyed code of this game would become fair game.  AT that  point is time to make an offer to buy it !.

 

That way better some money for it as apposed to nothing!

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I think the client codes and license to them are actually more valuable than the server codes for EMU to go public/kickstarter.  That would allow the devs to bring modern graphics to the game, and a mass appeal for new players.   The server codes?  I don't think we need it.

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EA's trademark has lapsed, their copyright continues. We had someone who was alumni with an EA exec. He approached the exec and asked about it, the response essentially indicated they did not have the code anymore. They bought Westwood primarily for C&C and all of its associated storyline (which this game has some ties to) and they will never, ever, ever give that up. :)

 

So, while nice idea in some respects, it is simply unlikely, and unless EA approaches us we've given up on such concepts. We'll simply develop unless they deliver us a letter that says "Stop."

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What case is that Rod? I'm curious hehehe

here's an article on it!

 

http://www.law.com/corporatecounsel/PubArticleCC.jsp?id=1202577265944&Supreme_Court_Copyright_Case_Could_Change_Nature_of_Ownership&slreturn=20130023003433

 

Supreme Court Copyright Case Could Change Nature of Ownership

 

Last Monday, while most federal government offices and businesses were closed in anticipation of the arrival of Hurricane Sandy, it was business as usual at the U.S. Supreme Court, which was hearing arguments in Wiley v. Kirtsaeng—a copyright case that could change the fundamental view of property ownership in the United States.

Even after the oral arguments, however, it's impossible to predict how the justices will rule in the high-stakes case. And lawyers on both sides say some issues will likely remain unresolved no matter what. So a diverse coalition, which includes library associations, museums, bookstores, and online retailers, has established the Owners' Rights Initiative (ORI)—a group created to educate members of Congress about how changes to copyright law might affect them.

"When you have a situation where there is lack of clarity in the law, the most likely outcome is that the issue will fall into Congress's lap," said Andrew Shore, executive director of ORI.

ORI members include: American Free Trade Association; American Library Association; Association of Research Libraries, Association of Service and Computer Dealers International and the North American Association of Telecommunications Dealers; Association of Research Libraries; Computer and Communications Industry Association; Chegg; eBay Inc.; Goodwill Industries International Inc.; Home School Legal Defense Fund; Impulse Technology; International Imaging Technology Counsel; Internet Commerce Coalition; Network Hardware Resale; Overstock.com; Powell's Books; Quality King Distributors; Redbox; United Network Equipment Dealers Association; and XS International.

The case, considered one of the most important intellectual property matters to come before the high court, concerns the "first sale" doctrine in copyright law—a concept that leaves owners free to resell, lend, or give away copyrighted items without permission from the copyright holder. The doctrine has long been interpreted as one that applies to all goods, regardless of where they originated. But book publishers, software companies, and the movie and music industries, looking to protect their practice of setting different prices for different markets, argue that the doctrine should apply only to goods produced in the U.S.

These ideas now under consideration by the Supreme Court stem from a case that pits textbook publisher John Wiley & Sons against Supap Kirtsaeng, a student who came from Thailand to study at Cornell University and later at the University of Southern California. Discovering that textbooks almost identical to those in the U.S. were considerably less expensive in Asia, he had friends and family members send multiple copies of needed books to him, which he resold to students in the U.S. at a profit. Wiley sued Kirtsaeng for infringing its copyrights; the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled in Wiley's favor.

Like most cases heard by the nine justices, the impact of the decision will go beyond one student and one publisher. And ORI—with its slogan declaring "You Bought It, You Own It. (You Have a Right to Resell It)" splashed across its website—wants policymakers and the public to know what's at stake.

"When we purchase something, we assume it is ours," said Mark Griffin, general counsel of Overstock.com Inc., a member of the coalition. "What is proposed is that we change the fundamental notion of ownership rights."

Several coalition members—including librarians, professors, and corporate lawyers—recently spoke to reporters about the issue, painting a bleak picture of what might happen if the high court decides the first sale doctrine does not apply to goods produced overseas.

Libraries, whose collections include vast numbers of books bought abroad, could be prevented from lending certain books to the public. Museums would not be able to display works of modern art that are still under copyright but were produced abroad. Even Goodwill Industries, which sells and distributes used items, would have their right to operate freely curtailed. Large online retailers like eBay and Overstock.com would also find it difficult to sell goods if they cannot determine where those goods originated, according to ORI. 

Also, if the burden of determining the origin of goods falls to the seller, it will lead to a mountain of litigation—much like we see in patent suits today, Overstock's Griffin said. It's often difficult to determine which goods come from overseas, and if a retailer such as Overstock inadvertently sells something made overseas "it's an easy layup for a lawyer to go after us," he said. Griffin added that the litigation likely to follow, should sellers and lenders be made responsible for determining the origin of something, will create "a lawyers' retirement program."

Book publishers and the film and music industries say they have no intention of going after libraries or museums. They merely want to be able to continue their practice of market segmentation without being undermined by imports of their lower-priced goods intended for other markets. In court briefs, they argued that scenarios depicted by groups supporting Kirtsaeng are unrealistic. And in court last Monday, their lawyers said the scenarios were merely an imagined "parade of horribles."

The justices gave no indication of how they will rule, but their questions indicated they had concerns about consequences on both sides. With almost 30 amicus briefs filed in the case from such groups as the American Library Association, the Association of Art Museum Directors, the Motion Picture Association of America, the American Intellectual Property Law Association, and Goodwill Industries International Inc., it's clear that interest is widespread. Whoever loses will likely try to get policymakers in Washington to come to their aid.

ORI says it wants to be ready for the case's outcome. "We expect to start meeting with policymakers on Capitol Hill and in the [White House] in the very near future," Shore said.

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If the owners get their heads handed to them. Suddenly all that old  mental property like software also comes up for grabs.  Especially in cases of abandoned software.

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